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Posts Tagged ‘american dental association’

Previously we have written about oil pulling and the possible effects it may have. More recently, the American Dental Association has come out with a statement regarding oil pulling. While there may be benefits, the ADA does not recommended oil pulling as part of a patient daily home care routine. Currently there is not enough scientific research available to definitively determine that oil pulling reduces cavities, whitens teeth and improves oral health and well being (www.mouthhealthy.org).

For more information see: http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/o/oil-pulling

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As we create new resolutions for 2017, Business Insider wrote an interesting article about signs of stress. The article cites 11 signs that physically show when you are under stress. One key factor in the dental field we pay attention to is bruxing (grinding) or clenching. Frequently in our office we will ask various questions that will help us determine if you are clenching or grinding. If you suspect you are clenching or grinding or simply have questions, please ask us at your next dental visit.

Here is the article about Stress.

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Flossing has been in the news a lot as of recently. Several agencies have come out and stated that flossing is not important. The American Dental Association and several other US Agencies have said this not the case for great oral health. These organizations encourage flossing daily as inter-dental cleaners help address areas that cannot be reached with a regular toothbrush. Please read the following rebuttal from the ADA. Please do not hesitate to contact our office with any questions you may have.

http://www.ada.org/en/publications/ada-news/2016-archive/august/association-responds-to-news-story-challenging-benefits-of-dental-floss-use

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Ever wonder what the dirtiest part of your body is?  Your Mouth is one of those areas. Your mouth contains MILLIONS of bacteria. A new study shows that tobacco use will increase the bad bacteria in your mouth. These bacteria typically create a biofilm (community) to live in.

“Once a pathogen establishes itself within a biofilm, it can be difficult to eradicate as biofilms provide a physical barrier against the host immune response, can be impermeable to antibiotics and act as a reservoir for persistent infection,” Scott said. “Furthermore, biofilms allow for the transfer of genetic material among the bacterial community and this can lead to antibiotic resistance and the propagation of other virulence factors that promote infection. (Hutcherson, June 20)”

Read More at: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160531082619.htm

University of Louisville. (2016, May 31). Tobacco smoke makes germs more resilient. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 20, 2016 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160531082619.htm

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According to several articles published recently and notably in the Huffington Post, the toothbrush you are using is probably riddled with fecal matter. Whats the problem with this? The problem is having the fecal matter of other people of your toothbrush, especially if you share a bathroom. The bacteria may affect you because it is not part of your normal flora of bacteria. What do you do to prevent disease from occurring? Remember to change your toothbrush once every three (3) months, do not share any toothbrushes, and also thoroughly rinse your toothbrush after use.

Read mroe at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/03/toothbrush-poop_n_7506456.html

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stock-illustration-5406528-floss-tooth-toothbrush

The great question every patient wants to know the answer to. Which do you do first, do you brush or floss first? According to the ADA and a new blog article written in the New York Times Online, it is recommended that you floss first and then brush. Why is this? It has more to do with habit than the science behind it. People are more likely to remember to floss if they floss before they brush. Read more at: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/05/29/ask-well-floss-or-brush-first/?_r=0

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There has been new research published by a doctor at Massachusetts General Hospital to show there is a link between Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Oral inflammation. The article looks at patients who have RA and the prevalence of certain bacteria which causes inflammation in RA and the oral cavity. The bacteria found to cause inflammation in both was Phorphymonas Gingivalis. This emphasizes the importance of controlling your oral health for your overall health and vice versa.

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150312123526.htm

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