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Posts Tagged ‘Boston post office square dentist’

Ever wonder what the dirtiest part of your body is?  Your Mouth is one of those areas. Your mouth contains MILLIONS of bacteria. A new study shows that tobacco use will increase the bad bacteria in your mouth. These bacteria typically create a biofilm (community) to live in.

“Once a pathogen establishes itself within a biofilm, it can be difficult to eradicate as biofilms provide a physical barrier against the host immune response, can be impermeable to antibiotics and act as a reservoir for persistent infection,” Scott said. “Furthermore, biofilms allow for the transfer of genetic material among the bacterial community and this can lead to antibiotic resistance and the propagation of other virulence factors that promote infection. (Hutcherson, June 20)”

Read More at: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160531082619.htm

University of Louisville. (2016, May 31). Tobacco smoke makes germs more resilient. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 20, 2016 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160531082619.htm

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There’s a new product on the market that may rebuild your enamel. The new ingredient is called BioMinF. This remineralizing toothpaste should help protect the teeth against acid attacks from soda and sugary juices. Read more at: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160411092258.htm

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Recently micro beads have made headlines in the news and also online. We have found that many patients have had these micro beads embedded under the gums. How else does it affect you? A blog article written by Cambridge Polymer Group talks about the effects of the micro beads on the enamel. Read more about it by visiting this link: Micro beads and Enamel. Do you have more questions? Feel free to ask your dental hygienist or dentist about this topic.

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As we all scroll through facebook, we see new information about various diets or lifestyle changes people are promoting. These diets can include raw foods, low-carb, juicing, etc. One does wonder how some of this affects the oral cavity. An article written in the Dallas Morning News addresses a lot of your questions. Follow the link here to find out more: How fad diets and faulty nutrition can spell dental doom

Be sure to discuss any diet changes with your oral health provider and come in regularly for dental cleanings and exams.

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Cancer, what a scary topic to discuss. A new study released goes on to explain that those who have cancer of the oral cavity or the pharynx, 47% can be attributed to cigarette smoking. Read more at: http://www.drbicuspid.com/index.aspx?sec=sup&sub=orc&pag=dis&itemid=318017&wf=2328

We are happy to discuss any concerns you may have in regards to cancer of the oral cavity. In our office, we screen for oral cancer as a part of your routine dental cleaning and check up.

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According to several articles published recently and notably in the Huffington Post, the toothbrush you are using is probably riddled with fecal matter. Whats the problem with this? The problem is having the fecal matter of other people of your toothbrush, especially if you share a bathroom. The bacteria may affect you because it is not part of your normal flora of bacteria. What do you do to prevent disease from occurring? Remember to change your toothbrush once every three (3) months, do not share any toothbrushes, and also thoroughly rinse your toothbrush after use.

Read mroe at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/03/toothbrush-poop_n_7506456.html

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The great question every patient wants to know the answer to. Which do you do first, do you brush or floss first? According to the ADA and a new blog article written in the New York Times Online, it is recommended that you floss first and then brush. Why is this? It has more to do with habit than the science behind it. People are more likely to remember to floss if they floss before they brush. Read more at: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/05/29/ask-well-floss-or-brush-first/?_r=0

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We frequently forget how important oral care is. A new article in Time Magazine has found that 91% of adults ages 20 to 64 have at least one tooth that has been treated for decay or has untreated decay. While oral care is being emphasized more and more, the statistics about decay are on the rise.

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We often talk to our patients about dental erosion. A new article published in the Journal of Public Health Dentistry reveals that soda and fruit juices are the biggest culprits of dental enamel erosion. The biggest statistic the article talks about is:

“Examining 3,773 participants, the researchers found 79% had evidence of dental erosion, 64% had mild tooth wear, 10% had moderate tooth wear and 5% displayed signs of severe tooth wear. The participants in the study with moderate and severe tooth wear consumed more soft drinks and fruit juices each day than the other groups.”

More information can be found at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/293727.php

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What do all of these things have in common? According to an article recently published in Medical News Today, kissing a person for 10-seconds transfers about 80 million bacteria from one mouth to the other. How does this affect me? Are you a person who has never had dental decay in your life and one day you go in and have several new areas of decay? Well this is one of the potential reasons for the new decay.

While here in the office, we often stress the need to scrape your tongue. Why is this so important? The article states that bacteria only stays in your saliva for a small period of time, however the bacteria stay on the tongue longer. Your tongue has these finger-like projections that allow the bacteria to stay on it longer if not scraped.

Read more at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/285563.php

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