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Posts Tagged ‘decay’

We frequently forget how important oral care is. A new article in Time Magazine has found that 91% of adults ages 20 to 64 have at least one tooth that has been treated for decay or has untreated decay. While oral care is being emphasized more and more, the statistics about decay are on the rise.

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Each time you come in to the office and sit in our chair, we check to see how your saliva flow is. Why is that we check? Saliva contains many important proteins that protect your teeth. They have minerals which can help re-mineralize your teeth. A new article published further explains the importance of saliva in the mouth. Saliva helps flush the food through your teeth and prevents the formation of biofilm (the soft plaque which bacteria uses to cause acid). Read more at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/285285.php

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Do you know how much sugar you are having? The above chart tells you how much sugar is in some of the common drinks we have. Looks like sticking to water is the best for your teeth.

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Benefits of Red Wine for your Teeth

There has been new research, which was published in the Journal of Agriculture and Chemistry, that states red wine and grape seed extract may help prevent cavities in the mouth. We’ll follow this and see what long term research results come of this study. 

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Sugar is a big part of our daily diet. Sugar can lead to decay in the mouth and other various systemic problems. Reading labels on foods and drinks can be quite confusing. A rule of thumb to remember when calculating the amount of sugar in a drink is 1 teaspoon contains 4 grams of sugar (1tsp = 4g sugar). A 16 oz bottle of sweetened tea contains 52 grams of sugar, which is about 13 teaspoons of sugar. A 20 oz bottle of cola contains 68 grams of sugar which is about 17 teaspoons of sugar. Next time you pick up a drink, check to see how much sugar is present. 

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March is for Nutrition

The American Dental Association (ADA) has recognized March for nutrition. Nutrition not only affect yours overall health but also your oral health. When purchasing foods, take into consideration how much sugar is present in foods. Look at the label on the side and check out choosemyplate.gov to learn how to read and understand labels. Foods with a large amount of sugar in it can promote decay by making your mouth more acidic. The ADA has a great video on Diet and Dental Health (click on the green diet and dental health to take you to the video). 

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Bacteria in your mouth

A new article released by Science Daily and research done by the University of York, found that plaque (food which accumulates on teeth) on a persons teeth has preserved the bacteria which caused decay 1,000 years ago. This bacteria found in the plaque is the SAME bacteria which causes decay in people today. Can you believe that? Read the full article at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140223131629.htm

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