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Posts Tagged ‘sciencedaily.com’

Ever wonder what the dirtiest part of your body is?  Your Mouth is one of those areas. Your mouth contains MILLIONS of bacteria. A new study shows that tobacco use will increase the bad bacteria in your mouth. These bacteria typically create a biofilm (community) to live in.

“Once a pathogen establishes itself within a biofilm, it can be difficult to eradicate as biofilms provide a physical barrier against the host immune response, can be impermeable to antibiotics and act as a reservoir for persistent infection,” Scott said. “Furthermore, biofilms allow for the transfer of genetic material among the bacterial community and this can lead to antibiotic resistance and the propagation of other virulence factors that promote infection. (Hutcherson, June 20)”

Read More at: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160531082619.htm

University of Louisville. (2016, May 31). Tobacco smoke makes germs more resilient. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 20, 2016 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160531082619.htm

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We all know milk is good for you but we never understood how we figured this one out. Consumption of milk goes back about 5,000 years. How did we find out people in the past drank milk? Scientist tested their dental calculus (tartar build up) for a protein that is present in milk called beta-lactoglobulin. Interesting to see how scientist can use dental tartar to understand the past. Today we understand milk is good for strong bones and great for calcium. Keep drinking that milk!

For more information read the full article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141127094944.htm

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Benefits of Red Wine for your Teeth

There has been new research, which was published in the Journal of Agriculture and Chemistry, that states red wine and grape seed extract may help prevent cavities in the mouth. We’ll follow this and see what long term research results come of this study. 

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